The Fall

The Fall

"We must understand the entry of sin into the creation. This involves not only the fact of the entry, but the very nature of sin itself and how it has affected every aspect of the created order." - Freddy Davis

Implications of The Fall

quotes below are drawn from the book, Gospel Fluency by Jeff Vanderstelt

  • [Adam and Eve] didn't believe. They didn't trust God's word and work. The problem was unbelief. The action was sin. The result was death.
  • As a result of their rebellion, sin entered the world and brought about death and destruction.
  • Adam and Eve rebelled against God by looking elsewhere for identity, purpose, and truth. They looked away from the giver and sustainer of life to the one who is committed to taking and destroying life instead. This lead to a spiritual death, or broken relationship with God. They turned to submitting to and believing in God to trusting in and submitting to Satan.
  • The second death was relational in nature. Before their rebellion, Adam and Eve were perfectly united, naked, and unashamed in each other's presence. However, after they sinned, they turned on each other and blamed each other. They were looking for someone to pay for what they had done.
  • When we sin, we feel shame, and then we look to blame someone. Someone has to pay.
  • This leads to the third kind of death, physical death... Sin produces death. Enemies kill one another... Eventually everyone dies.
  • And this physical death doesn't just affect humanity. All of creation is affected as humanity's sin wreak's havoc on our world. We see the physical effects of sin producing death and destruction everywhere on the planet as we continue to kill it with our selfishness and greed.
  • The wages of sin is death - spiritual, relational, and physical.
  • Sinful rebellion produces brokenness, suffering, and death. This is because rebellion against God is rebellion against the giver of life. And this rebellion begins and continues to go on because of unbelief in the truthfulness of God's word and the sufficiency of his work.